The Basics of Diabetic Neuropathy Prevention

According to the American Diabetes Association, approximately half of people who are living with diabetes suffer from some form of nerve damage. When nerve damage is the result of diabetes, it is referred to as diabetic neuropathy. Typically, diabetic neuropathy is more common among people who have been living with diabetes for a number of years.

People who have diabetes don’t produce enough insulin to break down blood glucose. As a result, the extra blood glucose can damage the walls of the blood vessels that provide nutrients to the body’s nerves. Nerves are responsible for sending pain messages to and from the brain. They also send signals about temperatures and touch. If the nerves are damaged, they won’t be able to send these signals or control other body systems. As a result, people with diabetic neuropathy may experience tingling, pain, and numbness in their feet and hands.

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