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How Do I Know If I Have Erectile Dysfunction?

How Do I Know If I Have Erectile Dysfunction?

Few men want to talk about their inability to get or maintain an erection, however, erectile dysfunction can have a profound impact on relationships and self-esteem. Fortunately, trouble in the bedroom doesn’t necessarily mean you’re dealing with erectile dysfunction. Most men will have problems with an erection at some point in their sexual history. But one bad day in the bedroom doesn’t mean major sexual health problems. So how can you know if you’re dealing with erectile dysfunction?

First, you need to understand what it is: What is erectile dysfunction? 

Erectile dysfunction isn’t just about not being able to achieve an erection. Oftentimes men can get an erection and still suffer from some of the early symptoms of erectile dysfunction. ED is more about the inability to get and maintain an erection that’s strong enough to have satisfactory sex. Satisfaction is the key word in that definition. And it encompasses a lot.

So, how do I know if I have it? Signs of erectile dysfunction: 

Erectile dysfunction (ED) has been a concern for men since the beginning of recorded history—it’s described on the walls of ancient Egyptian tombs and in the Bible. Thankfully, today there are effective treatments for ED. The first step is to recognize the most common ED symptoms and what they could mean.

Your ability to become aroused is a complicated process. Your emotions, brain, hormones, nerves, blood vessels, and muscles all play an intricate part in male arousal. When any of these pieces aren’t in line, it can cause some kind of dysfunction. It’s also important to remember that your mental health plays as much a part of your sexual ability as your physical health. Stress and other mental health concerns can cause or make erectile dysfunction worse. Minor health problems may slow your sexual response, but the accompanying anxiety that comes with the slow sexual response can shut things down entirely.

Occasional, or intermittent, sexual problems don’t necessarily point to erectile dysfunction. But you may be dealing with erectile dysfunction when the following symptoms are persistent:

Can I prevent erectile dysfunction?

Although it might not be possible to always prevent erectile dysfunction, taking care of yourself can help you avoid persistent problems. In general, the healthier you are, the less likely you’ll be to have erectile dysfunction. Doing the following can help:

What can I do about my ED? At Neuropathy and Pain Centers of Texas, our specialists have a strong commitment to treating patients with erectile dysfunction and their partners with compassion, respect, and empathy. Our goal is to return patients to these most intimate and private activities that can truly improve their quality of life. We encourage you to begin the journey toward erectile restoration by making an appointment to see one of our physicians. If you’re experiencing erectile dysfunction or have any symptoms of erectile dysfunction, contact Neuropathy and Pain Centers of Texas at (817) 242-5599 and let us help you treat your ED.

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